The Camels Love the Water

Camels can survive and perform without water for 2 weeks but if they find water they love it. When I was shooting the pictures, the temperature was 45.5 Celsius that time but they were absorbing the sharp sunshine while enjoying the water.

They especially love water when it is gushing from a broken water supply pipes or coming from a spring. Yesterday afternoon, I saw these 2 camels enjoying water in the desert.

Based on my desert exploration work and knowledge, all the desert creatures (flora and fauna) are highly resilient to the water scarcity but when they found it, they know how to enjoy, consume and conserve for the needy days.

You can see the Acacia tortilis tree in the driest terrain of the desert, they are happy and flourishing without water for hundreds of days but whenever they get rains, they enjoy and conserve water for the dry period.

Conclusion

The desert ecosystem is rich with unique and super genetic resources both of flora and fauna diversity. They are well design for the harsh and hardy climatic conditions and support the human being in these ecosystem. We just need to admire, respect, sustainably use and conserve for the next generation.

The world camel day is approaching on 22nd June, the main theme is the awareness about the role of camel as food security animal in the challenging climatic conditions. http://camel4all.com/world-camel-day-22nd-june-2019-is-approaching/

Sustainable Use and Conservation of Natural Resources for Future Generations

Water is one of the precious and the most needed natural resource in our daily life 1. Life without water is unable to think about. The highly precious source of water is natural springs and rivers. Balochistan is rich with such many sources which provide natural and healthy nutrients and environment263171_10150251489749743_2300034_n to its people. Due to climate change and grabbing of natural resources, such resources are under real threat.

We should save our mother earth along with all its blessing in the form of natural resources.

1. http://www.nationalgeographic.com/kidsnetwork/water/session_01.html#life

The future of Mongolian nomadic lifestyle under debate! Same situation of other nomadic societies in the world

The report is self explainatory. The situation of other Nomadic societis is almost the same.

Listen and download: Dr Caroline Upton talks on the issues facing Mongolian nomadic herdershttp://soundcloud.com/university-of-leicester/the-future-of-mongolian/s-aYEoy

 Geographers from the University of Leicester are involved in research on pastoralism, environment and livelihoods at a critical juncture in decision making over the future of Mongolia’s rural areas.Image

 The two year study, Community, Place and Pastoralism: Nature and Society in Post-Soviet Central Asia, funded by the Leverhulme Trust and involving work in both Mongolia and Kazakhstan, led to a meeting in Ulaanbaatar in September 2012, organised by the University of Leicester team and their Mongolian colleagues. At this meeting herders were able to discuss key land and livelihood issues directly with ministers, donors and government advisors.

 Dr Upton, the Principal Investigator for the project, said: “Mongolian herders are facing multiple pressures on their livelihoods, traditionally based on nomadic pastoralism, from climate change, mining, desertification and new policies on land. Through our project, national decision makers were brought together with affected parties and local stakeholders to debate some of the vital issues pertaining to nomadic culture, livelihoods and identity in modern Mongolia. They were also able to draw lessons from the Kazakh context, based on our project results.”

 Dr Moore, the project Research Associate, who spent 5 months conducting fieldwork in Mongolia, said: “The herders that I met were deeply aware of climatic and environmental change in their pastures that are affecting their lifestyle. They often have to move further and more often to find good grazing for their goats, sheep, horses and camels. Therefore many are concerned that any moves towards privatisation of pasture will reduce their ability to maintain their livelihoods and nomadic culture.”

 In recent years, Mongolian herders have been encouraged through government policy and donor interventions to form herder groups. These groups are designed to collaborate in pasture management, labour sharing and environmental conservation, as well as marketing of their livestock products, thus improving local livelihoods and resilience.

 A long-debated draft pastureland law, to be considered by the new Mongolian government in the next session of parliament, seeks to strengthen rights to key seasonal pastures for families and herders groups. Although this law focuses on possession rather than ownership rights, for some herders it has raised fears over the ultimate privatisation of pastureland and reduction in the ability to move, particularly in times of need.

 Government policy is also promoting intensification of livestock production. Thus, there are tensions between mobile and more sedentary livestock production in rural areas and questions are raised over the place of nomadic culture and identity in modern Mongolia.

 Dr Upton said: “This is a critical moment in decision making about the future of Mongolia’s rural areas. Enhanced rights of herders’ groups to key seasonal pastures have the potential to make positive contributions to local livelihoods and to conservation. Increases in mining activity also make the recognition of land rights especially important, so that herders’ voices may be heard in defending and seeking compensation for land loss and displacement.

 “However, centuries old traditions of mobility, flexibility and reciprocity should not be lost. As other pastoral cultures have found, ‘modernity’ does not necessarily equate with sedentarisation or privatisation. Nomadic heritages and practices retain great value”.

 The Leverhulme team are finalising detailed reports and articles to share with herders, international donors, and government policy makers, as part of their contribution to these vital, ongoing debates. Results of the work have also been presented at this years’ Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) annual conference in Edinburgh.

 

RESILIENCE OF NATIVE LIVESTOCK BREEDS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

The globe is under stressful pressure of climate change. Droughts, erratic and unseasonal rains, floods, and rise in mercury are the salient features of climate change. Some regions are under the severe affects of climate change, i.e. Saharan & and horn Africa and South-east Asia. Pakistan, India and Bangladesh are under severe floods since last few decades and each year the intensity is even higher than the earlier. In 2010, Pakistan was adversely affected with the floods and this year again, the intensity of flood is severe and havoc losses are reported from different parts of the Indus delta. The crops, villages and settlements came under the flood water and heavy losses to livestock farms.

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Author with the camel keepers in Cholistan desert of Pakistan

 

Being involve and active in the livestock breeds, conservation and policies, I learnt great lesson for the floods and the climate change. Small-scaled farming, pastoral people and landless farmers with the native livestock breeds were either not effected at all or rarely affected. Their livestock is not tied/bound in farms. Their livestock can escape from floods with their own will and do not need farmer support. On the other hand large farms with the exotic poultry birds were severely affected and seldom saved alive. The same was the problem with the high yielding industrialized cattle breed (Frisian). The native livestock breeds can walk longer, swim in water, and resist feed and water shortage. If fresh water is not available, they can rely on muddy flood water.

Native livestock breeds can resist after shocks of the flood in a great way, as they are resistant to diseases and other challenges  They do not need special housing and can be adapted to any circumstances in a short period of time.  They are polite and nice outdoor animals and well familiar with the owner commands and in many cases understand the name given by the owner. Camel and buffalo are unique of its kind in such situation. Such livestock breeds and their production potential are the real asset of the affected people. The native livestock is not only an asset for owner but a good producer of food item in such a harsh conditions. 

Such livestock breeds and production systems needs policy support and demand for strengthening and conservation. In the present situation as FAO is promoting the concept of global agenda of  action for sustainable livestock development and a multi-stake holders meeting is going to held (15-17 January 2013, Nairobi, Kenya), it is paramount need of time to consider the role of small/landless livestock keepers and pastoral livestock keepers. The policies void of their support cannot be fruitful. The recommendations proposed as the outcome of the livestock futures conference in Bonn, Germany are well explained and practical to take the small scale livestock keepers on board. 

Further reading:

http://www.livestockdialogue.org/

http://saves.org.pk/site/pub/29.pdf

http://www.rural21.com/english/news/detail/article/livestock-futures-conference-about-powerlessness-and-hope-0000466/