The Climate Change Forced African Pastoralists to Replace Cow with the Camel

Maalem is a camel pastoralist in Kenya and she is thankful for camel as this precious animal ensures livelihood in the climatic calamities of the region.maalem

Bone-dry plains roasted by a relentless equatorial sun. At first glance, there’s little to be found in the fields near Isiolo, a provincial town about five hours’ drive north of the capital, Nairobi. But Mariam Maalim’s camels still manage to find something to eat. They nibble at arid bushes, while the wooden bells around their necks tinkle softly.Kenyans turn to camels to cope with climate change

Camels survive two weeks without water

“My husband and I had a hundred cattle until 2005. But as the climate became drier in this region, the cows stopped producing milk, and twenty to thirty of our cows even died every year,” says 45-year-old Maalim, dressed in a blue hijab. “This made us decide to shift to camels as they survive without water for over two ­weeks. They continue to give milk, and although they become weak and skinny, they won’t die.”

For details please go to the link below;

http://www.dw.com/en/kenyans-turn-to-camels-to-cope-with-climate-change/a-38300987

 

 

The Milking Camels of Australia~World Camel’s Day Gift

The beautiful series of World Camel’s Day (WCD) is continue. The recent updates are received by Hannah Purss from Australia. She is telling about her camel journey and the milking camels of Australia. Here is her article in the ensuing lines.

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The disciplined Camel walking on grass instead of sand

“I was first introduced to camels when I was working in Central Australia, a hot, semi-arid region of the country. As I learnt about the valuable contribution camels made to Australia’s development, and the current wild population in the Australian deserts I realized what a valuable, yet wasted, commodity we have here. Dromedary camels do not roam free in other countries as they do in Australia, we are the only country that is yet to recognize their value. Here in Australia, wild camels are said to be in numbers above 300,000.  Most farmers and landholders that have access to wild camel populations view them as a pest, are uninterested in camels or are unsure of how to work with them.

 In 2014, Evan Casey and I founded Australian Camel Solutions Pty Ltd, a company that is based on solid and progressive camel handling and the development of the camel industry in Australia.

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The safe and friendly transportation of camels

 In Queensland, in Australia’s east, we have co-founded The Australian Wild Camel Corporation Pty Limited, a commercial scale camel dairy company. Being on the east coast of Australia means we can be closely linked with universities, academics and various dairy, camelid and veterinary experts.

We have been in operation for around six months now. We are having the most remarkable experience putting our theories and plans into practice, and as a team we are learning more each day.

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Hannah Caring her camels

Currently we are milking over 50 camels and as we move into Australian calving season, we hope to increase that number rapidly. The training program we use to bring camels from completely wild and out of the desert into our milking herd was developed by our company, Australian Camel Solutions, and is based on body language and the communication methods we’ve picked up from the camels themselves. In our dairy training program, we don’t use ropes or restraints on the animals which has helped us tremendously in the speed we can train them, and in keeping their stress levels down during the process. On farm, we have a vibrant, young team and it is especially exciting for me to see them growing in their camel handling skills and their passion for the industry. At TAWCC, we are passionate about fostering a supportive and progressive camel community.

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The Camel Milk

We have been conducting lots of product development – from fresh milk, to ice cream, yogurt and more. Our milk is currently being used to produce our own brand of camel milk soaps and skincare products. The skincare products are currently available only in selected stores, but very soon we will have them more readily available in Australian stores, online and hopefully around the world.

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The Happy, Healthy, Alert and Beautiful Camels of Australia

A very Happy World Camel Day from Australia!”

Hannah Purss, Australian Camel Solutions PTY LTD

www.camelmilkaus.com

The Best Option for Sustainable Food Production in Challenging Environment ~is the Promising Camel

Happy Camel’s Day (WCD)

Among the camel’s world, the subcontinent is the region where the day starts first. It is 22nd June in the subcontinent, so I can safely say Happy Camel’s Day. At the occasion of WCD, I started the series of articles based on the documents/material sent from different corners of the world. As my own share, I want to express my views on the role of the camel as a farm animal in NENA region.

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Not the ship but the gift of the desert

Near East and North Africa (NENA) is one of the driest and challenging landscapes on the face of the earth. The major percentage of the global deserted lands fall in this region, making it a hostile ecosystem for many other livestock species. Nature blessed the region with the highly adapted and unique livestock species “the Camel”, well said as Ataullah in Arabic.

As mentioned in the holy book Quran “do they do not look at camel; how strange it is created?” the camel is the animal of unique characteristics’ making it the most valuable creature of the drylands. The people living in this region, especially the camel herders and pastoralists depend on the camels for food, accessibility, and other livelihoods. Camel produces milk in very high ambient temperatures and other climatic challenges, in the same environment, other livestock species are hard to survive. Camel is not in competition with any other livestock as camel browse on very woody and bushy vegetation.

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The desert’s friend…

In the climate change scenario and fragile security (in some parts of Iraq, Libya, Yemen, and Syria) camel is the animal of choice to provide precious food items as milk (primary product) and meat to ensure the survival of the people. Camel farming needs very low input making it a sustainable profession.

Based on my experience and scientific findings, I can say that camel is the most sustainable farm animal in the region. The cow model (cow dairies) is not sustainable in such a hostile ecosystem and the milk produced is very expensive if calculated in the ecosystem model as the cow needs many times more water to produce one liter of milk. The camel tolerates very high ambient temperatures, on a contrary, the cow needs a cooling system (using fossil oil) to produce milk in the same situation.

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Camel ensures accessibility in the remote areas

The quality of camel milk is very appreciating than that of cow milk. Free of allergen protein, intolerant lactose and low in the saturated long chain, fats making the camel milk the best choice for health sensitive people. The region needs to ensure joint efforts for making policies regarding the food and agriculture and keep the camel on top priority as an animal of food security in climate change scenario.

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They are not in competition with other livestock species

The organization “Camels4Life” which is an advocacy group supporting camel’s cause,  is always willing to support both governments and NGOs for finding ways to use a camel as a sustainable farm animal contrast to its old vision of beast of the burden.

For more details, please go to the link below.

https://camel4milk.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/camel-a-one-in-all-creature/

http://www.thenational.ae/uae/health/al-ain-doctor-sees-potential-in-camels-beyond-their-milk

Camel Milk Has Gained Interest and Sales in the US—A World Camel’s Day History and Update

The series of World Camel’s Day, these updates are sent by Christina Adam from the USA. She is well known for her initiatives ‘using camel milk for autistic patients’.

Christina Adams MFA, USA, Contact: cadams@xiqllc.com, Twitter@camelmilkinfo,

https://www.facebook.com/christinaadamsauthorautismadvocate

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Camel in Texas at Baum family farm

Camel milk for human consumption has enjoyed a recent sharp spike in the US. Trends in autism and health-related awareness led the young domestic industry from almost zero consumers to thousands in four years. Camel milk is an exciting new product, yet the lack of domestic camel history in the US means camel milk causes ‘upturned noses.’ People are afraid it will taste ‘weird.’ That’s why the sick-person market is the main target of domestic producers. Only the ill or adventurous will try it, and the per-bottle cost of $12-25 USD is a deterrent to healthy people. But autism and food allergies/intolerance in pediatric patients are insufficiently treated with mainstream medicine, so parents like these are willing to use alternative and supplemental products like camel milk– not only to alleviate these problems but for well-tolerated dairy products for baking, drinking and travel use.

Camel milk for human consumption has enjoyed a recent sharp spike in the US. Trends in autism and health-related awareness led the young domestic industry from almost zero consumers to thousands in four years. Camel milk is an exciting new product, yet the lack of domestic camel history in the US means camel milk causes ‘upturned noses.’ People are afraid it will taste ‘weird.’ That’s why the sick-person market is the main target of domestic producers. Only the ill or adventurous will try it, and the per-bottle cost of $12-25 USD is a deterrent to healthy people. But autism and food allergies/intolerance in pediatric patients are insufficiently treated with mainstream medicine, so parents like these are willing to use alternative and supplemental products like camel milk– not only to alleviate these problems but for well-tolerated dairy products for baking, drinking and travel use.

2016-06-08 16.47.57Bottles of frozen US camel milk

My son was perhaps “patient zero” in the use of camel milk for autism in the US. When he developed autism, and was later diagnosed at age 2.9 years, I learned diet was a key part of managing symptoms for many kids. When I removed cow dairy products from his diet, his language improved and his red cheeks faded within weeks. Later, it became clear that cow dairy products worsened his autism symptoms. When he was around 5, eating pizza with the cheese removed caused him to walk in circles and hand-flap (classic autism symptoms) and he stated “it feels like there’s dirt in my brain.” Back then, only time and sometimes digestive enzymes would lessen the symptoms. (His recovery process is told in A Real Boy: A True Story of Autism, Early Intervention and Recovery, https://www.amazon.com/Real-Boy-Autism- Intervention-Recovery/dp/0425202437?ie=UTF8&ref_=cm_cr_pr_product_top).2016-04-30 14.32.48.jpg

American women learn to groom camels at Oasis Camel Dairy

When he was seven, I met a man with a camel and his comment that camel milk was used in hospitals in the Middle East for premature infants due to being perceived as non-allergenic made me seek it out. After finding camel milk allergy and autism articles from Dr. Reuven Yagil, at great expense I imported raw frozen camel milk from Bedouins in the Middle East. After drinking 4 ounces of milk, my son experienced an incredible overnight improvement in his autism symptoms (outlined in my GAHM Journal article http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3865381/). It also became effective as a treatment for his negative food responses to dairy, sugar and caffeine, such as hyperactivity, insomnia, oppositional and giddy behavior, often working within 15 minutes.

 I told many people about camel milk and increased my research, so when I learned that American Amish farmers were milking camels in 2011, I went public with our experience in 2012. International articles, speaking and radio shows help me spread the word about this natural healing substance. I feel very positive about camel milk, because even when it doesn’t cause a large improvement in a given child’s autism symptoms, it offers a widely tolerated source of calcium and nutrients for children and adults ona dairy-free diet.

Word spread widely also due to a Facebook group called Healing with Camel Milk, which was started by two mothers of health-impaired kids. Online sources like these, including my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/christinaadamsauthorautismadvocate and Twitter@camelmilkinfo, have helped parents learn about the milk and find safe sources. While I’ve helped families with autistic kids since 2000, now the daily messages are due to camel milk and autism. These come from the US and people around the globe.

Camels have been a force for good, unifying sick people and those who can help them, with camel milk historically being given to the sick in other countries. I’ve been pleased to discover that camel farmers in the US and professionals camel dairies in other countries have been very sympathetic to their customers, giving discounts to the most needy and using clean production methods. In the US, there are currently around 10 camel dairies, from those milking a single camel to one producing over a thousand bottles per week. Raw is the dominant form of milk, with pasteurized a distant second. Camel milk kefir and colostrum are also sold. New technology like flash-pasteurizing and sales of imported powered milk and chocolates add to the dairy farmers’ sales. Imported camel milk will appear in additional products soon. Yet the primary fluid milk market remains autism.Camel! A One in All Creatures

The tiny US industry will certainly grow once more people become aware of the potential benefits. Due to a lack of camel history and educational centers familiar with the animals, such US awareness will take time. In the meantime, I don’t have to go to the airport and wait for midnight flights from the desert anymore. I have delicious cold milk delivered straight to our doorstep. It may be less exciting, but nothing feels as good as opening a big insulated cooler with 40 bottles of frozen camel milk, and stacking them neatly inside my freezer. It is a feeling of richness and peace, one the camel cultures of the world know well—except they don’t need a freezer. They have camels.

Unfortunately, some quarters blaming camels for spreading MERS disease which is all lie and void of scientific support. Blaming Dromedary Camel For MERS

The Nature Engineered Distinctive DNA to Beat the Challenge of Climate Change

Thank God, my dream came true as; specially engineered camel DNA (revealed in a recent study) makes this unique animal a solution to climate change and other challenges. The study ( the author was part of it) published in PNAS with full access here. a day before. The authors have ensured that the remarkable story over its long and celebrated history stands out like a scientific beacon. Without the camel, Arabian trade, medieval conquests, and recent communication routes would all have collapsed, changing the course of events for human civilizations as well as that incredible diversity among the camel gene pools of Asia, Africa, and even Australia.

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A unique and pioneering study of the ancient and modern DNA of the ‘ship of the desert’ the single-humped camel or dromedary has shed new light on how its use by human societies has shaped its genetic diversity. DNA Sequencing Reveals Human Desert Migrations Shaped Camel Genetics.

Dromedaries have been fundamental to the development of human societies, providing food and transport in desert countries, for over 3,000 years. The dromedary continues to be vital for livelihood, food, and recreations where other species would not survive. In the current context of climate change and advancing desert landscapes, the animal’s importance is increasing and there is new interest in the biology and reproduction of the species.

In my opinion “genetic mixing and re-mixing engineered special DNA (camels) as; by constantly mixing the populations, the camels are now very genetically diverse which makes them more resilient to climate change. As predicted by the climate scientists, the mercury will go up with the passage of years, the camels will be the best choice among the others for food security and sustainable farming systems.

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The study suggests that the wild camels, which are now extinct, periodically helped restock domesticated populations. Unlike many other domesticated animals, modern camel populations have maintained their ancestral genetic diversity, potentially enabling adaptation to future changes in terrain and climate, according to the authors.

For more general articles the links are given in the ensuing lines. The links are referred in the article also.

References;

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36252141

http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2016/05/human-migrations-shaped-camel-dna

http://www.sciencecodex.com/origin_of_dromedary_domestication_discovered-182056

How trade routes forever changed the dromedary camel’s genetic makeup

http://nhv.us/content/16056061-first-domestication-dromedaries-took-place-southeast-arabian

http://www.earthtimes.org/conservation/diversity-camels-conserved-3000-years/2938/

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/june-2013/article/ancient-trading-networks-and-arabian-camel-diversity

Dairy Camel ~ Transforming from Desert Ecosystem to Modern Farming

The old world camels (Dromedary and Bactrian) are well adapted to the harsh (both cold extreme and hot extreme) and hostile (deserts with scarce water and feed availability) ecosystems of the northern hemisphere of the globe. The centuries-long evolution and adaptation (selection for traits of choice by pastoralists) process made it unique and highly resilient animal to the calamities of its ecosystems. The pastoralists (traditional Institutions) managed and validated precious indigenous knowledge of camel husbandry, behavior, welfare, products development & management, breeding & neonatal care, health and recreation in the course of history while facing many challenges. The camel was mainly used in that period (pre-historic to the automobile) as a beast of burden (wars, pastoral transportation, desert accessibility etc), while milk, meat, and other products were used as by-products (additional asset).

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The onset of automobile industry replaced (the intensity increased with the modernization and abundance of the automobile) the role of the camel as the beast of burden. This evolution resulted from camel to turn to its original task ~ The Milk. The thin/ smart and light camel types (mostly from desert) desert were selected for racing and riding. Camel racing – (a multi-million dollar industry in the Middle East) evolved and a set of racing norms along with rules and regulations came into being. Today UAE is home to this joyful sport and camel with racing traits are attracting million of AED annually.

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The heavy camel with clear body confirmation, well-confirmed udder, milk vein etc is selected for milk production and use as dairy animals. Again a modern dairy industry is co-evolving towards a modern camel dairy in the Middle East. As camels have roots in Arab culture, both types of camel activities (racing and dairying) are developed and established in this region with the dry ecosystem.  I really do not know about the challenges being faced by the racing industry, the hurdles in the dairy industry are much obvious and easy to establish. Selection for dairy traits (its heritability) is still a dream in the emerging industry. The breeding goals for this purpose are not yet established and practice.

This shift from the old to modern camel agriculture resulted in many challenges. One of the main constraints of the modern (confined dairying) is the intensive environment (housing, feeding, milking and breeding etc) which bring many hurdles like fatigue/weakness, craving/weakness, mastitis and welfare, infertility etc. Selection for body/udder confirmation is hardly practiced while selecting/buying a camel for a dairy purpose which leads to difficulties in milking and handling in the modern milking parlor.5636501.jpg

Camel feeding is another constraint, especially in confinement. The Scientific approach is seldom practiced in this regard. In most of the cases Alfalfa or another type of hays along with some TMR and mineral mixture. I think the camel needs more (some unidentified fectors~as camel have special physiology) as camel had evolved with the unique feed requirements. Author documented more than 50 plant species as like/feed by camel in free-roaming feeding system of Suleiman Mountainous Region of Pakistan. Narrowing the diversity of feed items may cause/enhance the issues like fatigue, mastitis, and fever etc. Camel nutrition (dairy) is the utmost need issue and need further scientific research and practice.

The combination of narrowing diversity of feed items, confinement and stress (parlor along with the intensity of treatment) invite complex ailment situation which affects both the animal itself and probably the products consumers. Such challenges need to be addressed technically and scientifically with the course of time. A strange and painful factor (hiding experience) has been noticed among the camel dairy technical practitioners as they avoid to share knowledge. Some technical personnel and scientists do not want to share their experience and knowledge to keep their position strong and important.  Institutional support is lacking and research institutes prioritize cow dairy and other fields (with more research articles and subject material). University level subjects related to the camel and its modern role must be incorporated for the students of the region. Institutional support in all aspect of modern camel farming is the pivotal part of camel development. The author has suggested a scientific session on modern camel dairying and its challenges in the next ISOCARD conference (2015 Kazakhstan).

Lyme (Khurarra) Disease and Camel Milk

Traditionally known as ‘Khurarra or Khulaganda’ in Pashtu, having almost the same symptoms as discussed for Lyme disease from other parts of the world. Symptoms of Lyme disease (usually a bacterial infection) includes a fawn colour coating of the tongue, halitosis, dysgeusia (an abnormal taste in the mouth), and gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal distension, gas, flatulence, cramps, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting, indigestion, heartburn (acid reflux), and other problems.

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According to our traditional knowledge (TK), the Pashtun Pastoralists directly strip camel milk in the mouth of the affected patient. They practice it 3-4 times daily (3-5 days) and the patient recovers in 5-9 days. This practice is being used for centuries and it is very useful. Some people use goat milk in the same way for this disease.

Positive results with drinking of camel milk for the treatment of Lyme is also reported from the other parts of the world.  According to renowned Physician Dr. Millie Hinkel from the USA ‘I’m seeing such positive results with Lyme disease patients who are on the camel milk’.  The joint pain and muscle fatigue seem to disappear and the gut issues dissipate usually within a few days to a few weeks.

CAMEL MILK A NATURAL PHARMACY………..Dr. Abdul Raziq Kakar