Camel is Turning to its Original Task, the Milk

Camel milk’s demand is ever increasing among the nontraditional consumers, mostly on health ground. The camel milk is rich with certain molecules which are health promising, therefore, camel milk is known as natural pharmacy. New camel dairies are emerging and the already established firms are increasing their camel number and buying elite camel genetics for milk. The are some very important camel milk contests in different parts of the UAE in different time periods. Alwathba camel festival with the milk competition is one of them. I attended the contest of Alwathba and compiled some important information. I share it in the this blog with the camel lover people.

Each year there are many camel milk contests in different parts of the camel habitats but the most prominent and unique one is Alwathab, AbuDhabi, UAE.

There are mainly 3 groups of camels in contest

  1. Majaheem or Hazmi: Found in KSA, UAE and Oman and extends up to the Yemen.
  2. Mahajen (Cross of Arabi and Majaheem): Mainly found in the adjoining areas of Hazmi and Arabi
  3. Arabi: Mainly found in UAE and Oman
Arabi Camels, having good milking ability and are calm milking animal (Fashoosh in Arabic)

The interest in milking camels is ever increasing. Camel is a real treasure, whatever you want to search you will find. The people are treasuring the milk of the camel.

Mixed camels’ group.
Mahajen or Mixed Camels

Camel Milk Competition in Cholistan

Camel milk competition concluded last evening here in Cholistan desert (of Pakistan). It was quite interesting in many ways and I felt that at least I should share some of its salient features. It started on 12th October and concluded on 14th. Some 40 camels (locally called Dachis) contested and some owners had more than one. All animals were towards the end of their lactation. The size of the calf also matched with this narration. First thing was that it was not the best time for such competitions because camels generally calve in Jan/Feb/March and better time could have been April/May.Barela Camel is the Milk Line of Riverine Pakistan
 These Breela camels won the milk competition in Punjab Pakistan
The participants were not just the men and grownup boys as happens with our cattle/buffalo competitions in March every year. Rather families were there. Milkers combinations were man and wife or man and daughter or mother and daughter or mother and son etc. It was heartening to see these lively families. Amma Pathani (Mom Pathani) was very prominent. She contested like other men and forced even me (the chief judge) to announce results of every camel first in the local dialect, then in local language and then in national language as it was difficult for her (and other contestants, mostly unable to read or write) to wait for more than few seconds. So I had to round things for announcing and remain precise on paper. Her camel got 4th position and was given a special prize. Milk yield (once a day milking, recorded for two days) for 1st, 2nd and 3rd position camels was 17.1 (Bawali), 15.7 (Katti) and 15.1 (Malookan.  I wonder if they could produce at this level in 9-10th months of their lactation what would be the yield in the 2nd month after calving. We will see next year.
 Another important yet expected information was that most of these animals were 2nd and 3rd calvers with some 1st calvers and very few in later parities. Most belonged to either Barela (the dairy breed) or a cross between Barela and Marecha (the racing and dancing breed). Very few were Sindhi or crossbred Sindhis.
Camel dances at the event were worth watching. We had to walk on sand (with camels on our back) about 2 km to the prize distribution ceremony and dances continued. People seemed drunk with camel milk as they did not stop for a second. Age was not a limiting factor. It ranged from ~4 to >80.
 An important announcement is that next year’s camel milk and dance competitions will coincide (conclude) with the camel day, 22nd June. As announced previously, camel conference is planned next year at Bahawalpur and site of milk competition is just 35 km from the city.
Camels from Pakistan are going to Gulf and even to France (for camel milk chocolate) but without a proper breeding and replacement system, my fear is that sustainability issue will haunt in future. Exploitation of camel herders is also feared. Thanks to all those who kept encouraging and were even trying to see everything through sound waves. We will try to post on this discussion forum as the next year events unfold. Few photos are placed. More photos with videos will be posted on http://fangrpk.org.
Reported by
Dr. M. Sajjad Khan
Professor/National Project Director
Dept. Animal Breeding and Genetics
University of Agriculture Faisalabad 38040
PAKISTAN