Livestock Sector Development in China

China, being the largest country with human population has developed its livestock sector efficiency manifolds in last 2 decades. China transformed its production system from a rural based subsistence system to a high in-put and intensive system.  The challenge of malnutrition and hunger was beaten by three prong approaches, i.e.

A. Policy Development

B. Investment  in Agriculture sector

C. Farm Mechanization and Technology transfer

Now China has enough food to feed it more than 1 billion population on one hand and export some food item on the other hand. All types of animal and plants products are available at comparatively cheaper prices. The food crisis especially of animal origin is no more prevailing.

The other very appealing development in China’s livestock sector is the proper manure management. The manure is used for Bio-gas production and then transformed in LPG or use for power generation. Such development is very much in coordination with the vision of the GAA and sustainable livestock agenda of the FAO.

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On the other hand, such high in-put livestock production system resulted in some very serious and negative effects. The native genetic resources for food and agriculture are at stake and many of them are already vanished. Such losses are very noticeable in poultry, pig and cattle genetic resources. Also, small scaled livestock production systems and pastoralism are adversely affected adversely. The importance of all the above three unique resources are well recognized and appreciated globally. The Chinese scientists have realized this phenomenon and striving to cover the losses and improve products quality through minimizing chemical in puts (pesticides, weedicides, synthetic fertilizer) and stimulate organic & Eco agriculture at country level.

Chinese agriculture and livestock sector is a good lesson to learn for the developing nations. Enough food provision is not the only task but a sustainable and eco-friendly production is the ultimate way for a bright future of a nation.

Genetically modified failures

press

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Don’t believe what you hear from vested interests, rent-a-quote ‘scientists’ and’ bought’ politicians. After nearly 20 years of promises that genetically modified food would revolutionise our world, feed the hungry, boost the yields and therefore the incomes of farmers, and even cure disease, genetically modified crops have never lived up to those promises.

These are the genetically modified failures that big biotech refuses to be accountable for, doesn’t want you to know about and the reasons why we continue to say ‘NO!’ to GMOs.

Failure to deliver

http://fortumo.com/affiliate/pressinside
Despite the hype, genetic modification consistently fails to live up to industry claims. Only two GM traits have ever made it to market – herbicide resistance and BT toxin expression. Other promises of genetic modification have failed to materialise.

The much vaunted GM ‘golden rice’ – hailed for a decade as a cure for vitamin A deficiency and night blindness still hasn’t…

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U.S., Malaysia Lead Worldwide ‘Land Grabs’

ECO-opia

By Stephen Leahy   

Uxbridge — Africa is the main target for “land grabs” by foreign investors, according to a new report on large-scale land acquisitions around the world released Monday.

“Africa is the place for cheap land deals and most investors are from Western countries like the U.S. and UK,” said Michael Taylor of the International Land Coalition (ILC).

A small number of farmers are receiving fertilizer and training in conservation agriculture through a government/FAO programme.

Photo:                   Mujahid Safodien/IRIN  

 

Globally some 45 million hectares of land has been or is about to be signed over to foreign investors in Africa, Southern Asia and Latin America. That’s equivalent to 60 percent of Europe’s farmland.

About half of this land is for food production and half for biofuels, according to data compiled by the ILC, a global alliance of nearly 100 civil society and intergovernmental organisations, including the World…

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Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine | Abstract | Ethnobotanical knowledge on indigenous fruits in Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions in Northern Namibia

See on Scoop.itSustainable Livestock Agenda SLA

Indigenous communities in Namibia possess a rich indigenous knowledge expressed within many practices of these communities.  

 

56.3% of the respondents reported that indigenous fruits were declining. Only a 42.2% indicated that the indigenous fruits populations are increasing. Regarding to the management practices to improve the production of these indigenous fruit trees; 38.6% reported that there are some efforts on management practices; on the other hand 61.4% reported there are no management practices on the indigenous fruit trees in their areas. Four species were found to be the most frequently used and mentioned fruits which need to be given high preference in terms of conservation are: Berchemia discolor, Hyphaene petersiana, Sclerocarya birrea and Diospyros mespiliformis. .

See on www.ethnobiomed.com