Author Archives: Dr Raziq

About Dr Raziq

I’m PhD in Animal Agriculture, currently working as a Technical Manager at Al Ain Dairy (Camel Farm), Alain, UAE. I had worked as a Professor and Dean, at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan (LUAWMS). I work on and write for the subjects of ‘turning camel from a beast of burden to a sustainable farm animal’, agricultural research policies, extensive livestock production systems, food security under climate change context, and sustainable use of genetic resources for food and agriculture. I’m the founder and head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES), Founder of the Camel Association of Pakistan and Organizer of the Group Camel4Life. I also work as a freelance scientist working (currently member of steering committee) for Desert Net International (DNI). I’m an ethnoecologist, ethnobotanist, Ethnovet and ethomedicie researcher and reviewer. I explore deserts and grazing lands for knowledge and understanding.

About Camel Milk~With Bactrian Perspectives

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

Camels’ milk is the king of the milk kingdom, said by the Bactrian camel keepers in the Central Asia. It is the first choice for health maintenance. They think that their milk is more nourishing than their sister camel (dromedary) and all other animals. Our milk is high grade but tastes a little bit salt because of my taste as I like salty bushes; the only ice cream for me in the ecosystems where I live. I live in very cold regions and hence producing milk more thicker than my sibling dromedary. My milk keeps a desirable PH of human body as it is a bit alkaline. I have physical effect on the stomach of my keepers to make them happy and in a good mood. my bactrian

My milk is rich with protein (4.5%), making me special food item for the poor and under nourished group of human being. Bactrian milk…

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Customary Laws of Pashtun Pastoralists in North-eastern Balochistan

Communities' Animal Genetic Resources and Food Security

The land inhibited by Pashtun pastoral people in northeastern Balochistan is owned by communities. Only the roadsides, railway lines and the state areas near the towns and cities belong to the state. There is no conserved area by the Government in the Pashtun lands of Balochistan. Every community and has his own area, which is comprised both of mountainous and plain lands.

After the crop harvest, during the monsoon rains, the pastoral people move towards high mountains and graze the remote and high peaks of the mountains. This type of movement saves their livestock from foot and mouth disease also. The piedmonts and the plain lands are conserved and nobody is allowed to graze animal there, the conservation is called as Pargorr. The temporary and short settlement in the mountains is called as Gholai. They come down to the plain lands crossing the piedmonts and settle for the…

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Yawn May Reveal How Smart You Are.

The longest yawn periods tell the intensity of the intelligence. The yawning duration in human is 6 seconds followed by camel with the 5 minutes duration. This statement means that this precious animal (the camel) is next to human in intelligence.  Your yawn may reveal how smart you are: Mammals with bigger and more complex brains gape for longer Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3821906/Your-yawn-reveal-smart-Mammals-bigger-complex-brains-gape-longer.html#ixzz4NL8bIFod Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook. Some other animals like rats, African elephant, horses, etc also have a longer duration of a yawn after humans. There is need of a study to compare the yawn duration among these species of animals to reveal the smartest animal. yawning-camel

According to the camel keepers, the camel is the most intelligent animal. I have visited and traveled with camel herders in different parts of the world. Assessing the potential of the indigenous livestock breeds of Baluchistan. I have been asking this question very often, the answer was always yes ‘they are very intelligent’. They learn very quickly. They understand commands of the owner. camelyawning_knuttz

I hope someone will work on this side of camel too, to understand the exact potential and intelligence of camel.

Taking Camel Milk is a Way to Flush Your Body Clean of Toxins While Making You Strong and Shining

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

A gift of nature and gold of desert, the camel milk (CM) is miraculously proving as a superfood and natural flush. Because of the appreciable level and unique combination of nutrients (minerals, vitamins, protein, and fatty acids etc.), CM has medicinal properties covering a wide range of ailments. Such ailments wide in range and comprising of autoimmune diseases, allergies, asthma, rashes, diabetes, liver disorders, rheumatism, inflammatory conditions, piles, urethral irritation, infectious diseases, stress/depression, peptic ulcers and even cancer.

Image result for camel milk products emirates camelait Camelait! a pasteurized milk

The manifolds enriched levels of minerals (potassium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, sodium and zinc) than cow milk, making it a strong flush for body toxins. The flushing of toxins is the utmost need of time as we are taking toxins from the poisonous croplands. The Poisonous Fields

Not in the Mood? A Tonic for Mature People

Camel milk is use as the aphrodisiac, especially in the stressful conditions of…

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World Lion Day: A visit to big-cat filmmakers Beverly & Dereck Joubert — TED Blog

Wildlife filmmakers Beverly and Dereck Joubert spoke at TEDWomen 2010 about their commitment to saving Africa’s big cats from extinction. The biggest factor that threatens these majestic animals: trophy hunters. Dereck and Beverly Joubert have been living in the bush in Botswana, making wildlife and conservation films together, for more than 30 years. Their films have shaped…

via World Lion Day: A visit to big-cat filmmakers Beverly & Dereck Joubert — TED Blog

India’s addiction to milk as a diabetes pandemic moves to the villages

I have one comment on genetic engineering to increase level of insulin in cow’s milk to combat the ever increasing diabetes in India. The camel milk is already proven as rich in insulin like protien and capsulated by fats molecules which enable them to bypass the acidic medium of stomach. So, India better should work on camel milk to provide medicinal milk to the diabetic patients and to conserve and promote its camel population which is otherwise sinking.

ILRI news

DSC_3977_MilkTree_Cropped

A ‘milk tree’ illustration at the National Dairy Research Institute, in Haryana, India
(photo credit: ILRI/Susan MacMillan).

Note: This is the eleventh in a series of articles on
‘Curds and goats, lives and livelihoods—
A dozen stories from northern and eastern India’.

PART 11: India’s addiction to milk
as a diabetes pandemic moves to the villages

By Susan MacMillan and Jules Mateo,
of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

Addiction to milk in India, the biggest milk-drinking country in the world, is only getting bigger amid rising demand for food in this, the world’s second-most populous nation. As reported recently in Bloomberg, ‘Though eating beef is often taboo in India because the animal is revered in Hinduism, the country produces more than 160 million metric tons of milk a year as demand rises for cheese and other dairy products.’

Haryana_DairySign_Enhanced

One of endless branded advertisements for Indian dairy products (photo credit:…

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Is Coffee Really Going to Extinct Because of Climate Change?

The Arabica coffee plant, the source of all bushes on coffee farms, is expected to go extinct within the next century. Researchers from the Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, recently found that global warming is having disastrous effects on the plant. The “bioclimatically suitable localities” (places where the plant can grow) are decreasing like crazy. Within just a few years, the places that are sufficient for wild coffee growth are expected to decrease anywhere from 65-100 percent.

coffee.jpg

For more details;

http://www.msn.com/en-ae/lifestyle/tipsandtrickfood/coffee-is-going-extinct-this-is-what-you-need-to-know/ar-BBu5uS4?li=BBqrVLO&ocid=UP97DHP