How to categorize camel for breeding and selection?

The Role of Traditional Animal Genetic Resources for Food Security Under Climate Change Influence

Assessing adaptation of camel to a specific ecosystem by the body condition scoring is a new idea. This idea/theme was introduced by the author during Ph.D. work in the Suleiman mountainous region of Balochistan. A number of 60 camels of the same age, sex (all female), and physiological status and body condition score were selected from each breed (Kohi and Pahwal or Gaddai) for this study (total 180). This study was continued for 135 days. The animals were grazing freely in the same grazing area. The major feedstuffs were trees and bushes, i.e. Acacia, Olivia, caragana spp, haloxyllon etc. No extra feed was offered to the camels of the study.

Dsc04033 Kohi camel with BCS 3

  1. Body condition scores 1. Weakest animal.
  2. Body condition scores 2. Weak animal
  3. Body condition scores 3. Fair animal
  4. Body condition scores 4. Good animal
  5. Body condition scores 5. Excellent animal

The BCS was assessed at the last week…

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Published by Dr Raziq

I’m PhD in Animal Agriculture, currently working as a Technical Manager at Al Ain Dairy (Camel Farm), Alain, UAE. I had worked as a Professor and Dean, at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan (LUAWMS). I work on and write for the subjects of ‘turning camel from a beast of burden to a sustainable farm animal’, agricultural research policies, extensive livestock production systems, food security under climate change context, and sustainable use of genetic resources for food and agriculture. I’m the founder and head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES), Founder of the Camel Association of Pakistan and Organizer of the Group Camel4Life. I also work as a freelance scientist working (currently member of steering committee) for Desert Net International (DNI). I’m an ethnoecologist, ethnobotanist, Ethnovet and ethomedicie researcher and reviewer. I explore deserts and grazing lands for knowledge and understanding.

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