Camel Journey ~ From its Original Habitat to Modern World


camel importance is increasing

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

Camel role is incredible in its cradle of domestication and its original habitats. In 19th Century some camels were transported to USA, Australia, and some other places for work and armies. After automobile revolution the role of camel as beast of burden was gradually diminished 1,2.

In Australia there are thousands of feral camels, now It’s estimated a million camels are roaming across Australian deserts unfortunately considered as beast. Government launches project to kill camel (considering as pest) and save the scarce water resources in the region 3. Many friends from Australia and other parts of the world (including author) raised voice to halt such killing and wasting such a unique resource . The camel activists gave many good arguments to save camel; a tool to adapt with the climate change and judiciously use of the scattered bushy vegetation of the region 4. Unfortunately there are many…

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Author: Dr Raziq

I’m PhD in Animal Agriculture, currently working as a Technical Manager at Al Ain Farms for Livestock Production, Camel dairying, Alain, UAE. I had performed as a Professor and Dean, at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan (LUAWMS). I work on and write for the subjects of ‘turning camel from a beast of burden to a sustainable farm animal’, agricultural research policies, extensive livestock production systems, food security under climate change context, and sustainable use of traditional genetic resources for food and agriculture. Iim advocating camel under the theme of CAMEL4LIFE and believe in camel potential. I’m the founder and head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES), and Founder of the Camel Association of Pakistan. I also work as a freelance scientist working (currently member of steering committee) for Desert Net International (DNI). I’m an ethnoecologist, ethnobotanist, Ethnovet and ethomedicie researcher and reviewer. I explore deserts and grazing lands for knowledge and understanding.

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